What Public Speakers Get Wrong And Audiences Need

What Public Speakers Get Wrong And Audiences Need

It’s been nagging at me for some time now that the speaking business is changing, because audiences are changing, and speakers are responding in precisely the wrong way. Meeting planners, speaker bureaus, and speakers everywhere take note. What’s happened? A little history is in order. In 2008-9, the speaking business – the conference business – […]

Where Are All the Storytellers?

Where Are All the Storytellers?

In the early days of my blog, back in 2008 (almost a decade ago!) when I argued for more storytelling in public speaking, the idea was radical. Now, it has gone mainstream, nearly. Almost everyone pays at least lip service to the importance of storytelling in public speaking, and some people are even actually doing […]

How To Talk to Audiences so that They Remember What You Say

How To Talk to Audiences so that They Remember What You Say

Some recent research on memory and retention has important implications for public speakers everywhere who care about their audiences actually remembering what they’ve said. First of all, the good news. The human brain can retain ten times more than previously thought, a new study finds. That’s as much information as the entire Internet. It’s petabytes, […]

How to Give a Memorable Presentation

Neuroscience is finally starting to crack the twin processes of remembering and forgetting – with important implications for public speakers. Important because, as I’ve talked about before, audiences forget more than they remember – a whole lot more – and the process of public speaking is a poor way to present information. At least, information […]

The Dirty Secret of Public Speaking – and What to Do About It

One of the dirty secrets of public speaking is that audiences don’t remember much of what you say. I’ve seen a range of studies over the years showing retention of anywhere from 10 to 30 percent of what an audience hears. Many, many efforts have been made to increase that percentage. Microsoft funded some studies […]